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Exploring Movement in Art

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Exploring Movement in Art

WrMany programs are caught in the discursive mode, neglecting other creative, nonverbal, sensory experiences that cross disciplines and unlock imagination and creativity.  One way to experience and deepen appreciation of visual art is through non-discursive kinetic energy, using sounds and movement.
Many programs are caught in the discursive mode, neglecting other creative, nonverbal, sensory experiences that cross disciplines and unlock imagination and creativity.  One way to experience and deepen appreciation of visual art is through non-discursive kinetic energy, using sounds and movement. 
 
 
One fifth-grade class visited a large city museum.  A group of three boys stood in front of a bold, black and white Franz Kline painting while the docent watched in amazement as they moved their arms diagonally in vigorous arcs while describing the “firmness, strength, slashing, and thrust” of the artist’s brush strokes. She noticed other students discussing an Impressionist painting. They not only used their voices; they talked with their fingers and hands using flicking and dabbing motions. The docent had never seen students so actively engaged in viewing paintings.  She asked their teacher, “What have you been doing with these students? They look like they’re dancing the painting!”  The classroom teacher explained, “We’ve been finding kinetic energy in art.”
 
 
How can painting reveal kinetic energy?  Aesthetician Langfeld (The Aesthetic Attitude, 1920) referred to this tendency toward movement as “motor attitude,” “motor
response,” and “empathic response.”  In German the term “Einfuhlung” means “feeling into” and can be translated into English as “empathy.”
 
Dancer, author and movement-analyst Rudolf Laban (1975) referred to this energy in people as “effort.”  He studied the qualitative aspects of human movement, voice, and intentional effort in dance, theatre, and business transactions.  He then categorized the effort of human energy. Herman and Hollingsworth (2001) utilized Laban’s work and developed strategies for aesthetic viewing.  Use your kinesthetic sense and intelligence to sense energy in art!
it
Many programs are caught in the discursive mode, neglecting other creative, nonverbal, sensory experiences that cross disciplines and unlock imagination and creativity.  One way to experience and deepen appreciation of visual art is through non-discursive kinetic energy, using sounds and movement. 
 
 
One fifth-grade class visited a large city museum.  A group of three boys stood in front of a bold, black and white Franz Kline painting while the docent watched in amazement as they moved their arms diagonally in vigorous arcs while describing the “firmness, strength, slashing, and thrust” of the artist’s brush strokes. She noticed other students discussing an Impressionist painting. They not only used their voices; they talked with their fingers and hands using flicking and dabbing motions. The docent had never seen students so actively engaged in viewing paintings.  She asked their teacher, “What have you been doing with these students? They look like they’re dancing the painting!”  The classroom teacher explained, “We’ve been finding kinetic energy in art.”
 
 
How can painting reveal kinetic energy?  Aesthetician Langfeld (The Aesthetic Attitude, 1920) referred to this tendency toward movement as “motor attitude,” “motor
response,” and “empathic response.”  In German the term “Einfuhlung” means “feeling into” and can be translated into English as “empathy.”
 
Dancer, author and movement-analyst Rudolf Laban (1975) referred to this energy in people as “effort.”  He studied the qualitative aspects of human movement, voice, and intentional effort in dance, theatre, and business transactions.  He then categorized the effort of human energy. Herman and Hollingsworth (2001) utilized Laban’s work and developed strategies for aesthetic viewing.  Use your kinesthetic sense and intelligence to sense energy in art!
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